The health of your teeth and gums can affect the health of your entire body. Maintaining good health in both your mouth and your body as a whole is much less expensive and much more enjoyable. Drs. Shad, Richard, and Clive Ingram are very concerned that all of their patients remain as healthy as possible, and all of us at VIP Smiles feel the same way. We have provided this page of information to help you understand the importance of your dental and overall health. If you have questions, and to make an appointment with our caring and experienced dentists in Syracuse, Utah, please contact us today at 801- 406-1090.

Periodontal Disease and Your Heart (CLICK on the links below to learn even more):

More Effects of Gum Disease

Medical Effects Associated with Gum Disease

A recent study in a prominent cancer journal found that men with a history of gum disease are 14 percent more likely to develop cancer than men with healthy gums. In fact, researchers uncovered that men with periodontal disease may be:

  • 49% more likely to develop kidney cancer
  • 54% more likely to develop pancreatic cancer
  • 30% more likely to develop blood cancers

People with periodontal disease may be at 2-3 times the risk of having a stroke (brain attack) compared to people without periodontitis.

Periodontal organisms might be associated with the development of preeclampsia. A dangerous condition that occurs in pregnant women.

The bacteria of Periodontal disease can be found in the atherosclerotic plaque of coronary artery disease (these plaques clog the hearts blood vessels and lead to heart attack).

People with deep periodontal pockets had an increased risk for abnormal changes on their EKG’s. (A common test to examine the electrical activity of the heart.)

Periodontal diseases may contribute to the progression to prediabetes. Researchers found that having periodontal disease can cause someone to develop prediabetic characteristics, and probably disturb the glucose regulation of a non-diabetic who has prediabetic characteristics, contributing to the progression of Type 2 diabetes.

12 studies provide direct evidence of the association between pulmonary (lung) infection and oral diseases.

It has been found that diabetes and periodontal disease can lead to atherosclerosis.

Women with periodontal disease were at a greater risk for having a low birth weight and preterm birth babies than those without periodontal disease

Bacteria commonly found in the mouth and associated with periodontal diseases can be found in the amniotic fluid of some pregnant women.

79% of the women with untreated periodontal disease had delivered a preterm low birth weight baby compared to only 7.5% of the periodontally treated women and 4.1% of the healthy women.

The number of bacteria in periodontal pockets and around the teeth may contribute to an individual’s risk of a heart attack.

Researchers found that pregnant women with periodontitis had 65 percent higher C-reactive protein (CRP) levels compared to periodontally healthy women. CRP levels are a marker of systemic inflammation and are associated with periodontal disease, a chronic bacterial infection found in the gums of the mouth. CRP has also been associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes, including preeclampsia and preterm delivery.

A recent study suggests that edentulous, or toothless, adults may be more likely to have chronic kidney disease than adults with teeth. Untreated periodontal disease is the main reason for adult tooth loss in the United States.

New research confirms findings that periodontal disease may increase a person’s risk for the respiratory disorder Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), the sixth leading cause of mortality in the United States. The study also noted a correlation between the amount of periodontal disease and lung capacity.

Reality television has become a popular form of primetime entertainment. The latest topic helps people enhance their features from head-to-toe through plastic surgery. However, if a patient already has a bacterial infection in the body or mouth, the surgical procedure may have to be postponed. On one episode, the patient was unable to proceed with breast augmentation because of a bacterial infection in her mouth known as periodontal disease. The periodontist and plastic surgeon were concerned that the bacteria in the patient’s mouth may affect the outcome of her plastic surgery.

Bacteria from periodontal disease can enter the blood stream and can compromise recovery from any surgery, but is particularly problematic for patients receiving implants, transplants, or replacements of body parts since it may cause these procedures to fail.

Researchers have found that people with gum disease are almost twice as likely to suffer from coronary artery disease.

One study of 1,147 men and found risk from periodontal disease for coronary heart disease, fatal coronary heart disease, and stroke to be as high as 2.8 times greater than for those without periodontal disease.

A new study shows that lifetime exposure to inflammation, including gum disease, may have a significant impact on the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease.

Dr. Charles Mayo, the founder of the World Famous Mayo clinic was a big proponent of oral health and he understood the effect that oral health has on the rest of the body. He stated that “The presence of dental health is important. Dentistry is distinctive health services and can extend human life ten years.”

We are cheated out of 10 years when we do not have a healthy mouth. That’s 10 years lost with your spouse or children. 10 years can be the difference between seeing your grandchildren be born or grow up or them never knowing you.

Periodontal bacteria can be transmitted from one person to their spouse or their children. By leaving this disease untreated you will not only harm yourself but you may harm for spouse and children as well.

Untreated Gum Disease can lead to tooth loss.

Look at the physical effects of tooth loss:

A recent study out of London found that food “rich in nutrients like nuts, apples and raw carrots could not be eaten easily for over 50%” of people with dentures.

Research at the University of Maryland Department of Nutrition shows that the “dietary quality and intake of certain nutrients was poorer among the group with self-perceived ill-fitting dentures than those with natural teeth or will fitting dentures”.

In the first year after a tooth is extracted the jaw bone decreases 25% in width.

People with dentures can only generate 5-6 psi versus 250 psi for someone with teeth. That decreased ability to grind up food compromises nutrition and health.

People with tooth loss report it affects their social and romantic lives.

7% of people who need dentures cannot tolerate them at all and are classified as oral invalids.

88% of denture wearers reported difficulty with speech.

60% of denture wearers are aware of denture movement.

As teeth and bone are lost there can be severe facial changes.

Recommended Related to Oral Health

Pulling a Tooth (Tooth Extraction)

“The Clinician’s Handbook of Natural Medicine,” by naturopathic physician, Dr. Joseph Pizzorno, describes periodontal disease as an inclusive term for the chronic inflammatory process that can destroy the gums and their underlying supportive structures (periodontium). The American Academy of Periodontists (AAP) confirms that periodontal disease can have systemic effects that are linked through inflammation. Periodontal disease can worsen diseases like diabetes, while instigating others like heart disease and stroke.

Inflammation

Infection is at the root of periodontal disease. Without proper preventative care and nutritional defense, the gums and supporting structures become vulnerable to bacterial invasion. To survive in the mouth, the invading bacteria produce chemicals that are damaging to human tissues. The infection, in turn, initiates an innate response by the immune system known as inflammation. Bacteria that invade and infect the gums and periodontium are difficult to reach. The microbes hide deep in the periodontal pocket where the roots of the teeth are situated. Deep in the darkness of the tooth pocket the bacteria thrive, replicate, and find their way into the bloodstream. As the infection is difficult to reach, the inflammatory process is prolonged, becomes detrimental to other systems in the body, and depletes immune system reserves.

Heart Disease and Stroke

Periodontal disease can lead to cardiovascular disease. The AAP issued the warning that people with periodontal disease are two times more likely to suffer from coronary artery disease than those who do not have the disease. An article on the official AAP website titled, “Gum Disease Links to Heart Disease and Stroke,” theorizes that the bacteria circulating in the bloodstream cause damage to the inside lining of blood vessels, promoting the development of the clots, which can lead to a heart attack. Similarly, if the blood vessels that distribute blood to the brain are damaged and become occluded due to clot formation, a stroke will likely ensue. The academy discusses a second theory whereby the prolonged inflammatory process involved in chronic periodontal disease will release cascades of chemicals in the body that will eventually damage the blood vessels as well.

Diabetes

The presence of periodontal disease can be a result of diabetes in some people, while in others, the onset of periodontal disease may worsen their diabetes, rendering them less able to control their blood sugar. Diabetics are known to be more susceptible to infections than the general population. The AAP article “Gum Disease and Diabetes,” states that a depressed immune system leaves uncontrolled type-2 diabetics susceptible to developing periodontal disease. A 1997 study published in the “Journal of Periodontology” determined that when longstanding periodontal disease was treated, diabetics whose blood sugar was once difficult to control were able to better manage their disease.

Pregnancy Outcome

The AAP also warns that pregnant women are thought to be 7 times more likely to deliver a premature or low-birth weight baby if they have periodontal disease. Researchers, Agueda and Echeverria in their article “Association between Periodontitis in Pregnancy and Preterm or Low Birth Weight: Review of the literature” suggest that the circulating bacteria and inflammatory chemicals induce early labor onset by interacting with the developing fetus

The importance of providing oral health care for pregnant women cannot be disputed. Data suggest that maternal oral health impacts pregnancy health; further research on the causal nature of this association is ongoing to determine if there is a relationship. Current guidelines and data suggest that dental care during pregnancy is safe. However, scaling and root planing is best accomplished between 14-20 weeks’ gestational age. Providing dental care for pregnant women will help remove potentially harmful bacteria from dissemination and possibly leading to other complications. As oral health care providers, we can educate our patients regarding the importance of oral health and on important preventive measures to maintain oral health.

Stillbirth Tied to Gum Disease in New Study

Periodontal disease is an infection of the gums that results from inadequate oral hygiene. Pregnant women are more susceptible to gum disease than non-pregnant women because pregnancy hormones soften the gums and make them more penetrable to bacteria. There are many negative consequences of periodontal disease during pregnancy, some of which relate to the mother and some of which relate to the baby.

Health Risks to Mother

The health risks of periodontal disease to a pregnant woman herself are the same as the risks to a non-pregnant woman. According to the American Academy of Periodontology, there are many risks associated with periodontal disease. Diabetes, cardiovascular problems and Alzheimer’s all occur with increased frequency in patients who have untreated periodontal disease. Further, chronic gum disease affects oral health. Tooth pain increases as diseased gums recede and the roots of teeth are exposed. Teeth can begin to decay and need to be pulled. Finally, uncontrolled gum disease can spread to the jaw.

Premature Birth

Unlike men and non-pregnant women with gum disease, pregnant women have additional risks from poor oral hygiene. Premature and underweight babies are more common to women who have chronic periodontal disease during pregnancy, say Drs. Michael Roizen and Mehmet Oz in their book “You: Having A Baby.” This is because the gums are vascular, or filled with blood vessels. A bacterial infection the gums can end up in the circulatory system, and from there, can infect the fetus, leading to failure to thrive. This causes babies to be born early, and birth weight often is below normal.

Stillbirth

The most severe consequence of periodontal disease in a pregnant woman is that her baby might be stillborn. The American Dental Association says that a certain bacterial species associated with gum disease, called Fusobacterium nucleatum, can travel through the mother’s blood vessels into her uterus. Since a fetus both swallows and inhales amniotic fluid, bacteria in the uterus can infect both the lungs and the digestive tract of a fetus. In cases of severe infection, this may lead to death of the fetus and stillbirth. While stillbirth is relatively rare as a consequence of periodontal disease, according to the American Dental Association, it’s nevertheless a risk for women to consider when assessing the importance of oral hygiene during pregnancy.

Periodontal (Gum) Disease and Its Effects on The Body

If you have been told you have periodontal disease (gum disease), you are not alone. Many adults in the US will have some form of gum disease in their lifetime. Periodontal diseases can range from simple inflammation of the gums to more severe problems causing serious damage to the soft tissue and bone supporting your teeth. But tooth loss isn’t the only effect periodontal disease can have on your body.

Research has shown evidence of an association between periodontal disease and other chronic inflammatory diseases. By releasing inflammatory molecules, bacteria, and toxins into bloodstream, or through simple aspiration (inhaling), periodontal disease can cause cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and Alzheimer’s disease. Even more alarming, periodontal health has also been linked to osteoporosis (bone loss), complications with pregnancies, and several respiratory diseases. Once the bacteria reach susceptible areas of the body, they wreak havoc and causes further inflammation and deterioration of the body’s vital tissue.

Gum Disease and Respiratory Diseases

Bacteria from the mouth can travel to the lungs causing respiratory diseases in people with periodontal disease.

Bacteria found in the throat and mouth can be pulled into the lower respiratory tract through aspiration (inhaling). Once in the lungs, the bacteria can cause infection or even worsen existing conditions such as bronchitis or emphysema. People who suffer from Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Diseases (COPD) typically have a more difficult time eliminating bacteria from the lungs because the lung tissues have been damaged either by years of smoking or air pollution. These damaged tissues are at risk for recurrent infections of respiratory diseases like pneumonia. Studies are now being done to learn how oral hygiene and periodontal disease may be associated with more frequent recurrences of respiratory diseases in patients with COPD.

Bacteria found in the throat and mouth can be pulled into the lower respiratory tract through aspiration (inhaling). Once in the lungs, the bacteria can cause infection or even worsen existing conditions such as bronchitis or emphysema. People who suffer from Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Diseases (COPD) typically have a more difficult time eliminating bacteria from the lungs because the lung tissues have been damaged either by years of smoking or air pollution. These damaged tissues are at risk for recurrent infections of respiratory diseases like pneumonia. Studies are now being done to learn how oral hygiene and periodontal disease may be associated with more frequent recurrences of respiratory diseases in patients with COPD.

Gum Disease and Memory Loss

Elderly people who experience tooth loss may be at increased risk for dementia.

It is hypothesized that inflammatory substances released by infected gums into the body enhance inflammation of the brain causing the death of neurons and speeds up memory loss. Current research suggests the loss of sensory receptors around the teeth have been linked to neuronal death, which in turn can cause more teeth to fall out further contributing to cognitive decline. Initial theories were only linked directly to Alzheimer’s or dementia. As research continued, they have found that it can also impair mental function and that patients who had fewer teeth were at an increased risk of memory loss or early stage Alzheimer’s disease.

Gum Disease and Osteoporosis

Women with periodontal disease are more likely to have bone loss (of the jaw) which can lead to tooth loss.

Recent studies suggest that osteoporosis decreases the density of the bone supporting your teeth. As the jaw bone deteriorates, the tooth detaches more and more, leaving it more vulnerable to infection and inevitable tooth loss.

Estrogen deficiency, in combination with osteoporosis, is also suspected to be one of the root causes in the progression of bone loss (in the mouth). Studies have concluded that women taking an estrogen supplement may be able to lower the amount of inflammation of the gums and decrease the rate of detachment from the bone.

Medical Conditions Associated With Periodontal Disease

Research has shown that there is a link between periodontal diseases and other chronic inflammatory conditions, such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Following are links to articles with more information about the connection between gum disease and overall health. More information

Medical Effects Associated with Gum Disease

A recent study in a prominent cancer journal found that men with a history of gum disease are 14 percent more likely to develop cancer than men with healthy gums. In fact, researchers uncovered that men with periodontal disease may be:

  • 49 percent more likely to develop kidney cancer
  • 54 percent more likely to develop pancreatic cancer
  • 30 percent more likely to develop blood cancers

People with periodontal disease may be at 2-3 times the risk of having a stroke (brain attack) compared to people without periodontitis.

Periodontal organisms might be associated with the development of preeclampsia. A dangerous condition that occurs in pregnant women.

The bacteria of Periodontal disease can be found in the atherosclerotic plaque of coronary artery disease (these plaques clog the hearts blood vessels and lead to heart attack.)

People with deep periodontal pockets had an increased risk for abnormal changes on their EKG’s. (A common test to examine the electrical activity of the heart.)

Periodontal diseases may contribute to the progression to prediabetes. Researchers found that having periodontal disease can cause someone to develop prediabetic characteristics, and probably disturb the glucose regulation of a non-diabetic who has prediabetic characteristics, contributing to the progression of Type 2 diabetes.

12 studies provide direct evidence of the association between pulmonary (lung) infection and oral diseases.

It has been found that diabetes and periodontal disease can lead to atherosclerosis.

Women with periodontal disease were at a greater risk for having a low birth weight and preterm birth babies than those without periodontal disease

Bacteria commonly found in the mouth and associated with periodontal diseases can be found in the amniotic fluid of some pregnant women.

79% of the women with untreated periodontal disease had delivered a preterm low birth weight baby compared to only 7.5% of the periodontally treated women and 4.1% of the healthy women.

The amount of bacteria in periodontal pockets and around the teeth, may contribute to an individual’s risk of a heart attack.

Researchers found that pregnant women with periodontitis had 65 percent higher C-reactive protein (CRP) levels compared to periodontally healthy women. CRP levels are a marker of systemic inflammation and are associated with periodontal disease, a chronic bacterial infection found in the gums of the mouth. CRP has also been associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes, including preeclampsia and preterm delivery.

A recent study suggests that edentulous, or toothless, adults may be more likely to have chronic kidney disease than adults with teeth. Untreated periodontal disease is the main reason for adult tooth loss in the United States.

New research confirms findings that periodontal disease may increase a person’s risk for the respiratory disorder Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), the sixth leading cause of mortality in the United States. The study also noted a correlation between the amount of periodontal disease and lung capacity.

Reality television has become a popular form of primetime entertainment. The latest topic helps people enhance their features from head-to-toe through plastic surgery. However, if a patient already has a bacterial infection in the body or mouth, the surgical procedure may have to be postponed. On one episode, the patient was unable to proceed with breast augmentation because of a bacterial infection in her mouth known as periodontal disease. The periodontist and plastic surgeon were concerned that the bacteria in the patient’s mouth may affect the outcome of her plastic surgery.

Bacteria from periodontal disease can enter the blood stream and can compromise recovery from any surgery, but is particularly problematic for patients receiving implants, transplants, or replacements of body parts since it may cause these procedures to fail.

Researchers have found that people with gum disease are almost twice as likely to suffer from coronary artery disease.

Scientists have found that bacteria that grow in the oral cavity can be aspirated into the lung to cause respiratory diseases such as pneumonia, especially in people with periodontal disease. This discovery leads researchers to believe that these respiratory bacteria can travel from the oral cavity into the lungs to cause infection.

One study of 1,147 men and found risk from periodontal disease for coronary heart disease, fatal coronary heart disease, and stroke to be as high as 2.8 times greater than for those without periodontal disease.

A new study shows that lifetime exposure to inflammation, including gum disease, may have a significant impact on the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease.

Dr. Charles Mayo, the founder of the World-Famous Mayo clinic was a big proponent of oral health and he understood the effect that oral health has on the rest of the body. He stated that “The presence of dental health is important. Dentistry is distinctive health services and can extend human life ten years.”

We are cheated out of 10 years when we do not have a healthy mouth. That’s 10 years lost with your spouse or children. 10 years can be the difference between seeing your grandchildren be born or grow up or them never knowing you.

Periodontal bacteria can be transmitted from one person to their spouse or their children. By leaving this disease untreated you will not only harm yourself but you may harm for spouse and children as well.

Untreated Gum Disease can lead to tooth loss.

Look at the physical effects of tooth loss:

A recent study out of London found that food “rich in nutrients like nuts, apples and raw carrots could not be eaten easily for over 50%” of people with dentures.

Research at the University of Maryland Department of Nutrition shows that the “dietary quality and intake of certain nutrients was poorer among the group with self-perceived ill-fitting dentures than those with natural teeth or will fitting dentures”.

In the first year after a tooth is extracted the jaw bone decreases 25% in width.

People with dentures can only generate 5-6 psi versus 250 psi for someone with teeth. That decreased ability to grind up food compromises nutrition and health.

People with tooth loss report it affects their social and romantic lives.

7% of people who need dentures cannot tolerate them at all and are classified as oral invalids.

88% of denture wearers reported difficulty with speech.

60% of denture wearers are aware of denture movement.

As teeth and bone are lost there can be severe facial changes.

Gum Disease: An Epidemic

Dental disease is an epidemic. Ninety percent of the population suffers from some form of this disease. Between 30 and 50 percent of the population has periodontal disease, the most destructive form of dental disease.